The quick guide on how to move around in Venice, Italy

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    Moving around in Venice, a city without cars

    Venice, in Italy, is the biggest pedestrian city in the world. Venice is also the ecological mobility leader in Italy thanks to the percentage of its inhabitants using public transportation.

    But what are the best ways to move around in a city without cars?

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    Moving around Venice by foot

    The best way to move around Venice, Italy, is on foot.

    In fact, going on foot in Venice is often the quickest way to reach your destination.

    It might sound like a health campaign (and it could actually be!), but truth is that Venetian are generally fit and healthy also because they move around mainly by walking.

    Move around Venice like a Venetian, walk!

    Moving around Venice by foot also gives the possibility to explore the city.

    It’s a chance to see the little bridges and canals of Venice that you’d otherwise miss on a water bus. On foot, in fact, you might accidentally discover some of the numerous hidden gems spread all around the city.

    Moving around Venice by vaporetto, 'waterbus'

    The second best option, and sometimes the only option, is to move around Venice by water bus.

    Public service runs 24/7 the whole year. During daytime, water bus stops on the Grand Canal are served at least every 10 minutes. Service to reach the islands of Murano, Burano, and Lido is at most every 20 minutes.

    During night time, the water bus stops are served every 20 and 40 minutes respectively.

    The price for a single ticket is 7,50€, and it is valid for 75minutes.

    You can buy water bus tickets in many places in Venice. Firstly, you can do so at the vendors’ machines in front of all the main stops. Secondly, you can purchase tickets also at the ticket offices outside the train station, at the Rialto and close to Saint Mark’s. There, you can ask questions, if you have any, and purchase your tickets. Lastly, you can buy tickets also at newspaper kiosks and tobacco shops.

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    Sometimes there are long queues at the vending machines as well as at the ticket offices. If you don’t manage to purchase a ticket there, don’t despair, you can do it on board of the water bus. But you will have to have cash.

    As soon as you step on your water-bus, immediately inform the sailor that you need to buy your ticket(s). Beware, only cash payment is possible in this case.

    One more word about tickets. You can buy a 1-day ticket that lasts for 24h after the validation, at a cost of 20€. There are also 2-day, 3-day, and 7-day tickets available. Their prices are respectively 30€, 40€ and 60€ [April 2019].

    For more information about prices, and online purchase you can visit www.veneziaunica.it.

    Moving around Venice by water taxi

    Locals in Venice (almost) never use taxis, because of their high fixed prices.

    Taxi service is almost exclusively used by tourists who are willing to experience a more private transportation rather than on the public boat.

    The price for a taxi ride is usually between 100 and 130 € per ride for up to 4 people.

    Up to 10 people can fit in a taxi, but you will be charged a fee per passenger from the 5th passenger onwards. The fee per passenger is around 15€.

    As you can see, taxis are far more expensive than public transportation, but they are also the only luxurious and private form of transportation over the water.

    Groups of 8 to 10 people should consider taking a tax instead of a water bus to reach Venice from the airport by water.

    In fact, the price for a group of 8 to 10 people to reach Venice via taxi or water bus is similar. However, a water bus will stop only at water bus stops, while a taxi will get you off exactly at your destination.

    Moving around Venice by gondola and sandolo

    We decided to mention also gondolas and “sandoli” in Venice, despite the fact that they are not a means of transportation. Instead, they are more like private sightseeing tours on the water.

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    You can find Gondola and sandolo tours all around the city. The rides, which offer beautiful views of the surrounding areas, last 30 minutes and cost 80€ per boat. A gondola or a sandolo can fit up to 6 people, plus the gondoliere or “sandolista”.

    Keep in mind that gondolas return to their boarding station. Unlike a water bus or a taxi, a gondola is not used to get somewhere.

    Gondolas and sandoli give you the chance to explore narrow canals and beautiful areas of the city that you wouldn’t see otherwise.

    Gondolas are one of the traditional Venetian boats and they used to be the equivalent to horse carriages in other cities. Sandolo tours work just like gondola tours, but on a different Venetian boat, a “sandolo”.

    The only gondola ride which is used to move around Venice, is the “traghetto”. A “traghetto” is a fare service on a gondola which lets you cross the Grand Canal.

    There are only 3 “traghetto services”, available in 3 different locations in Venice where there is no bridge available for crossing the Grand Canal.

    Rowing lesson in Venice on a typical Venetian Boat

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    How do Venetians move around Venice? What are our recommendations?

    Most of the time, Venetians prefer to move by foot. Moving by foot is the fastest and most efficient mean of transportation in Venice… if you know how to get to your destination, of course!

    Most Venetians use public transportation only when necessary. One such example is when they need to cross over water. Rowing boats are mainly used for sports or for the pleasure of rowing itself, while motor boats are mainly used for transportation of goods or for enjoying the lagoon on a day off.

    Therefore, our suggestion is to move around by foot if possible, in order to live Venice like an authentic Venetian. By doing so, you can explore Venice beyond the “touristy” places, avoid crowds and queues, and do something good for your health!

    We also recommend setting some time aside to see Venice from the water, in your preferred way. Seeing Venice from the water will give you a completely different perspective of this unique city!

    Besides, walking and taking a tour on a rowing boat are not just beautiful and fun activities. They are two ways that let you discover the city while helping you reduce your carbon footprint.

    Venice is a great place where to start going green, don’t you think?

    The New York Times has two more suggestions that will help you to go green and help fight climate change, you can check them out here.

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    Now, you know everything to move around Venice like a local.

    To also know where to eat, drink, and shop like a local and to find many other useful resources, make sure to check out the following links:

    Unlock a discount at the best local businesses in Venice

    Learn more about Venezia Autentica Friends' Pass

    I'm visiting Venice. Why should I follow your recommendations?

    The way you visit Venice has an impact both on the quality of your experience and on Venice itself.  Chilling, exploring, shopping, eating and drinking where the locals do, can make a huge impact both on the memories you bring home and on the local economy and community.

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